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Carleton Ravens likely to miss U Sports men's basketball championship for first time since 2002

Carleton University (File photo: CTV Ottawa) Carleton University (File photo: CTV Ottawa)
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The Carleton Ravens will likely not participate in the U Sports men's basketball national championship tournament for the first time in 22 years, following a first-round playoff loss on home court.

The Brock Badgers defeated the Ravens 70-69 at the Ravens Nest Wednesday night in the first round of the OUA playoffs.

TSN 1200's John Rodenburg says this is the earliest the Ravens have been eliminated from the OUA playoffs since 1998.

Carleton has won the last four U Sports national championships, and 17 of the last 20. The Ravens last missed the U Sports Final 8 in 2002, before winning five consecutive national championships.

The Ravens finished the OUA regular season with a record of 13 wins and 9 losses, including two losses to the University of Ottawa Gee-Gees.

In November, Ravens head coach Taffe Charles told the Carleton University student newspaper The Charlatan that the Ravens were "not going to win this year," saying the team is "just too young."

Three of the five Ravens starters for Wednesday's OUA playoff game are in their first year of eligibility, and the entire Ravens roster is eligible to return next season.

The Ravens could still receive the wild card invite to the U Sports men's basketball national championship tournament, but it's unlikely with four OUA teams posting better records this season.

The University of Ottawa Gee-Gees host Brock University in the OUA quarterfinals Saturday night at Montpetit Hall. Game time is 7 p.m. 

Correction

The Carleton Ravens will likely miss the U Sports national championship for the first time since 2002, not 2022 as the headline previously stated. 

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