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OC Transpo features tortoise on social media reminding riders to be 'slow and steady' near transit

OC Transpo is reminding customers to be aware of their surroundings (X/OC Transpo) OC Transpo is reminding customers to be aware of their surroundings (X/OC Transpo)
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OC Transpo is featuring a new four-legged reptile to remind riders to be vigilant around transit vehicles.

The new social media #SaferTogether campaign features a number of safety tips for riders when riding near or on board OC Transpo vehicles.

In a post to social media, the transit agency featured the new shell-ebrity wearing runners with the motto 'there's no prize for being first. Keep it slow and steady,' to encourage customers to be aware of their surroundings near moving vehicles.

"Our tagline, Safer Together, reminds us of the need for safety to be top of mind for both our customers and our employees," read a statement by OC Transpo director Lisa Bishop-Spencer to CTV News Ottawa.

"We deliberately chose a tortoise to address safety themes that pertain to 'rush culture.' Tortoises are universally known for taking their time and this imagery can help encourage customers not to rush for vehicles and look both ways when crossing at designated areas."

The agency made the following tips for riders:

  • Don’t rush to catch the train or bus.
  • Only cross at designated areas.
  • Look both ways and make yourself visible before crossing an intersection.

"Our tortoise has generated conversation and we’re not going to hide in our shell," OC Transpo said in the statement.

"The campaign will go on to address additional themes, such as minimizing distractions and being safe around transit vehicles. Safety is always top of mind."

It is unclear whether the tortoise will return to the campaign in the future.

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