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Here's how much it costs to rent an apartment in Ottawa in November

A for rent sign is displayed on a house in a new housing development in Ottawa on Friday, Oct. 14, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick A for rent sign is displayed on a house in a new housing development in Ottawa on Friday, Oct. 14, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
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The average cost to rent a one-bedroom apartment in Ottawa surpassed $2,100 a month in November, as rents hit the highest levels of 2023.

A new report by Rentals.ca and Urbanation shows the average cost to rent a one-bedroom apartment last month in Ottawa was $2,112, up from $2,052 a month in October. The average cost to rent a one-bedroom apartment in Ottawa increased 8.4 per cent in November compared to November 2022.

Statistics show the average cost to rent a purpose-built apartment and condominium in Ottawa was $2,238 in November, the highest monthly average rent in Ottawa this year.

The average asking rent in Ottawa in November was $1,730 for a bachelor, $2,542 for a two-bedroom apartment and $2,799 for a three-bedroom apartment.

Across Canada, Rentals.ca and Urbanation report the average asking rent for all residential properties in Canada was $2,174 in November, down $4 from October's record high of $2,178.

Vancouver has the highest average asking rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Canada at $2,894, followed by Toronto at $2,601 and Mississauga at $2,359.

The average asking rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Kingston was $1,809 a month in November, the 11th highest rent in Canada.

Average rent by month in Ottawa

Here is a look at the average asking rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Ottawa in 2023, based on data from Rentals.ca and Urbanation.

  • January - $1,928
  • February - $1,969
  • March  - $1,925
  • April - $1,892
  • May - $1,982
  • June - $2,003
  • July - $1,979
  • August - $2,063
  • September - $2,051
  • October - $2,052
  • November - $2,112

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