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Scallops, lamb and pouding chomeur: Speaker's cancelled garden party food donated to Ottawa Mission

The Ottawa Mission has received a donation of some high-end food from a cancelled Parliamentary party.

The event was to take place at the Speaker of the House of Commons' official residence in Chelsea, Que., but with Anthony Rota's resignation Tuesday, the event was cancelled at the last minute.

Rota's office told CTV News late Tuesday that the food was to be donated to the Ottawa Mission.

On Wednesday, Ottawa Mission spokesperson Aileen Leo confirmed to CTV News Ottawa the fancy foodstuffs they were receiving.

The list includes:

  • 100 seared scallops-crusted
  • 200 poached shrimp
  • 200 small lamb meatballs
  • 10 kg of pulled beef barbacoa
  • 200 pieces of fried chicken
  • 100 bao buns
  • 700 oysters
  • 100 pouding chômeur

Leo says the donation will be very helpful in meeting the ongoing need in the community.

"Food insecurity has worsened over the past almost four years since the beginning of the pandemic and the need for food across Ottawa has reached shocking levels. This is why we served more than 1 million last year to people across Ottawa who would otherwise go hungry," Leo wrote. "We’re very grateful for this donation and the donations from all of our partners to meet the need."

Last week, the Ottawa Mission released its annual impact report, announcing it had served more than one million meals in the past year.

Rota resigned as Speaker of the House Tuesday after inviting a man who once fought for a Nazi-controlled unit during the Second World War to the House of Commons during the visit of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy. Rota introduced the 98-year-old man, Yaroslav Hunka, as a constituent of his riding and a "hero", prompting a standing ovation in the house.

Rota apologized on the weekend and in the House of Commons on Monday but, after facing growing calls from both sides of the the aisle, stepped down on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin apologized for the entire affair, which he said "deeply embarrassed Parliament and Canada."

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